The NCAA Tournament Cup Police Is At War With The Media Elitists – Again

The NCAA cup police hit a new level today. One reporter had an NCAA cup, but had put one of those sleeves on it because it was hot. Was told to remove the sleeve.

— Mike Waters (@MikeWatersSYR) March 22, 2018

The 100 Year War between the NCAA Cup Police and the basketball media elitists seems to be back on this year thanks to some smartass media elitist who thought it would be funny to slide a hot sleeve over an NCAA cup at the Midwest regional in Omaha. Folks, you know the rules. Doesn’t matter if it’s a flaming cup of diesel fuel, no alterations to the cups. No outside drinks. No cups of any sort past the curtain.

What are you, a bunch of rookies?

This NCAA Cup Police War vs. The Media has been going on for years and has been documented on social for years. Take this 2014 report where Jason Gay had his kitty coffee mug confiscated:

BL: [You got] what you were looking for — eventually your mug was confiscated by an NCAA staffer who I’m sure did not smile. Was he at all embarrassed to be asking you to turn over your piece of illicit crockery?

JG: You know truthfully, Bill, this happened with about four minutes to go. And it has occurred to me a lot in the last couple of days that had they just let it go we wouldn’t be sitting here talking. I mean, this just would have been a non-story. I wouldn’t have gotten anything out of it. But with about four minutes to go — and this was a great game let’s not forget, UConn and Michigan State —  this individual came over and made a joke about taking the cup and mailing it to me. And I thought we were just having a laugh about it, but then it became relatively clear that the cup was being asked for.

I just want to get to the big picture here, which is of course–as you’ve talked about on your program multiple times–there are many great important substantive questions right now about how big college sports have become and the NCAA’s role in that. And we look around and we see the incredible compensation for conferences and coaches and at the same time the strict enforcement of the smallest kind of rules against college athletes to the point where they’re not able to make any kind of nickel on their efforts. You know that strikes a lot of people as being hypocritical, and I wanted to, in a very small way, call attention to what I feel is a strange selective enforcement of the NCAA.

The fine folks at Powerade sent me a 5-gallon cooler like they use on the sidelines during the tournament. I’m 100% pro-NCAA on this one. Powerade paid for that advertising space. The media elitists can deal with it for a couple more weeks.

This is no game…the crusty media people who give up their lives for this stuff will figure out a way to survive

While people are talking about the NCAA tournament cup police, I found a guy in Nashville who busted out electrical tape and scrissors because he wasn't about to give up his tumbler. A hero among media, IMO. pic.twitter.com/tYV9Ws7DYs

— Alex Scarborough (@AlexS_ESPN) March 22, 2018

snuck it past the cup police, though the NCAA cups are bigger so next time I'll be going the approved cup route

— Brooke Pryor (@bepryor) March 17, 2017

No NCAA tournament site for me this year, but at least there are some seasonal decorations to display. pic.twitter.com/rfgijeUKwZ

— Patrick Stevens (@D1scourse) March 16, 2017

How dare you try to slip past the NCAA Cup Police! pic.twitter.com/eAlhchiFBY

— Ben Shpigel (@benshpigel) March 28, 2016

NCAA cup police. Don't even think about it. pic.twitter.com/seqkBQXRjP

— Mark Whicker (@MWhicker03LANG) March 26, 2016

This is how it’s done, folks:

https://twitter.com/Russ_Steinberg/status/710884494639828992

No better sign that NCAA Tournament is upon us. And, yes, the Cup Police is already in place: http://t.co/H84fXPx0xQ pic.twitter.com/ZWqKMCJj86

— Ray Curren (@currenrr) March 16, 2015