Nashville Predators Fan Shipped A Dead Catfish To The NHL Office After Controversial Call

I mean, I’m not seeing goalie interference here. What was that? #Preds tie it with 0.5 seconds left and get it waived off. Wow. pic.twitter.com/fQvArRcs7c

— Mark Harris (@TweetsByHarris) April 4, 2018

How do I know playoff hockey is on the horizon? Well,  for one, we have fans in a fit of rage shipping a damn catfish to NHL office in Toronto over a bad goalie interference call.

Let me set the scene. Tuesday night, in a game that would’ve secured the division and #1 seed in the west, the Preds seemingly scored a buzzer-beater goal against the Florida Panthers to send the game to OT. But, instead, the NHL got their NFL on with a long ass review followed by an overturning of the goal due to “goalie interference”. From what I can tell, this new goalie interference rule is basically the old NFL catch rule for hockey. No consistency and nobody really knows what it is.

This obviously had Preds fans livid. Carrie Underwood was losing her mind on Twitter and Jack Bauer took a break from saving the world again to chime in with his thoughts, but the real winner here is this Preds fan who took time out of her day to ship a dead catfish up to Toronto, where the final call was made.

For those who somehow don’t remember from their wild Stanley Cup run last night, Nashville fans enjoy throwing dead catfish onto the ice from time to time. Sometimes they put it in their pants to sneak it into the arena. It’s a thing there, so this should come as no surprise.

And the grand total for this little message to the NHL? Around $140.

From The Tennessean:

Justin Bradford  originally reported on his penaltyboxradio.com blog that fan Briley Meeks paid $141.75 to send a dead catfish to the NHL offices in Toronto.

The catfish cost $7.25.

Shipping cost $134.50.

She told The Tennessean that she loves practical jokes. And when someone suggested on the Predators’ fan Facebook page to do it, well, she thought about it. Then did it.

“They (fans on Facebook) were joking,” she texted The Tennessean. “I decided I needed to be that someone. I am a huge practical joke person and I feel like this was the ultimate prank.”