Tony Romo’s Broadcasting Style Is Interesting If You’re Into Psychics

You know how I know Tony Romo’s broadcasting career is off to a solid start? Tony wasn’t trending on Sunday for sucking and here we are on Monday without Twitter dbags calling for his head. You know the usual sites that would hammer the guy. They’re all quiet.

And for good reason.

It turns out that Romo’s style is actually pretty interesting. Watch above as Tony calls out plays before they happen. Turns out the NFL playbooks are pretty similar and makes me wonder how, if Romo in booth knows what’s coming, the defenses don’t know a run to the left is coming. Maybe they do. Maybe some defensive guy will come along and predict plays.

Peter King is officially in love:

He saw things before they happened: Late in the first half, Romo said the Raiders would carefully push the ball downfield to see if they could get into field-goal range without turning it over. They did. He called a Tennessee blitz with 29 seconds left in the half, and here came free safety Kevin Byard on an Oakland screen. And he praised the Raiders’ offensive coordinator, Todd Downing, in his first game as a play-caller, when he called eight straight runs down the stretch, forcing Tennessee to stop Oakland; the Titans couldn’t. “How about this offensive coordinator!” Romo hollered. “”Run, run, run with the game on the line.”

Richard Deitsch got a pretty obvious response out of the CBS execs:

“He had a really good day,” Rikhoff said on Sunday night. “I felt he was really prepared, did a great job on replays, and it gives us a great foundation to work with now. He’s so fresh from playing the game and sometime I immediately noticed in our production meetings with teams just how comfortable players were with him. We have some broadcasters who players have no idea who they are. But they know Tony, and I think he’s able to get interesting things out of them because he is so close to the game.”

Richard will have his gushing report at some point very soon. It’s just a matter of time.

Add it all up and you’re about to get Tony Romo for the next 25-30 seasons – at least. Cris Collinsworth joined Inside The NFL in 1989. That’s a 28-year broadcasting run with no end in sight. You can see where I’m going here. Tony’s 37. Most of us on here will be nearing death by the time this guy hangs up the broadcasting mic.

My only real complaint is that Tony has that one button thing going on. Need to either go two or none.

  • Related TopicsFootball Tony Romo
    Joe KinseyBUSTEDCOVERAGE Writer
    I started Busted in 2007, sold it in 2011 and Coed kept me around to run this operation. Based in Ohio. Contact me: @bustedcoverage
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